activism · animal · animal cruelty · facts

How to Keep Your Cat From Scratching Furniture – and Why You Should Avoid Declawing at All Costs

As much as we adore them, it can drive cat lovers crazy to see their beloved feline claw at their furniture. Cats are capable of precious snuggles, amazing acrobatics, and hilarious antics but watching furniture get torn to shreds is not fun! 

Of course, clawing is a completely natural behavior for cats. According to PAWS, cats will scratch at furniture, carpet, and other objects for numerous reasons, such as to remove the dead outer layer of their claws, to mark their territory by leaving a visual mark and scent (cats have scent glands on their paws), as well as to stretch their bodies and paws. Unfortunately, for some inexperienced guardians, a cat’s need to claw might drive them to return or abandon their new feline. 

70 percent of shelter cats end up being killed including strays, feral and surrendered cats, so it’s important we keep cats happy and safe in their home by any means possible, and keep them out of shelters. So, if your cat is scratching at furniture and other items in the house, here are some tips for how to deter them.

Cat Trees and Scratching Posts 

I’ve invested in a cat tree so that my two kitties will have a place to scratch that is all their own (and of course, they love to lay and play on the cat tree!).  Scratching posts are another great investment. You may want to consider offering different materials like carpet, sisal, wood, and cardboard, as well as different styles (vertical and horizontal). You can use toys and catnip to help entice your cat into using them for scratching.

If your kitty has an appropriate outlet to get their scratching out, they are less likely to terrorize other less desirable targets.

Use Special Tape

If even with the cat tree and the scratching post, your cat still prefers your sofa for scratching, don’t worry, there are still ways to deter them. There is a special tape, such as Sticky Paws, that you can place on furniture to deter your cat away from scratching. It’s safe for furniture, as well as drapes and carpets.

Trim Your Cat’s Nails

Trimming your cat’s nails is important for maintaining their health. The ASPCA and the Humane Society of the United States both offer detailed tips for how to trim your cat’s nails, but if doing it yourself is out of the question (personally, I wouldn’t even attempt it for fear they would bite or scratch me!), many groomers will trim a cat’s nails, as well as veterinarians. Trimming your cat’s nails is also a humane and effective alternative to declawing a cat.

Whatever You Do, Please Don’t Declaw

While removing a cat’s claws may seem like an easy, harmless way to avoid scratches or damaged furniture, this practice is actually extremely harmful to one of our favorite four-legged friends and the process is far more serious than cat guardians may perceive.

Declawing is not a manicure. Declawing, also known as onychectomy, is performed across veterinarian offices across the United States, despite growing awareness of the practice as inhumane. Most people think that declawing just involves pulling a claw out which, if you can imagine having all of your fingernails yanked out, is frankly, awful enough. Declawing is actually 10 separate amputations of the last bone and nail in each toe. If performed on a human being, it would be like cutting off each finger at the last knuckle, warns the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS).

These procedures risk long-term lameness and behavioral problems, including making it less likely for a cat to use the litter box or more likely to bite. Declawing also can cause lasting physical problems for your cat. Side effects of declawing include pain in the paw, infection, tissue necrosis (tissue death), lameness, and back pain. Removing claws changes the way a cat’s foot meets the ground and can cause pain similar to wearing an uncomfortable pair of shoes. There can also be a regrowth of improperly removed claws, nerve damage, and bone spurs.

For those of us who love cats enough to have one (or more) in your home, please love them for what they truly are – claws and all. They shouldn’t be penalized for doing what comes naturally. Instead, love their wild side and give them more options that are acceptable.

Do you have any tips for deterring a cat from scratching furniture or other items in the house? Leave a comment below to share with other cat lovers!

This article was originally published on One Green Planet.

activism · animal · animal cruelty · cruelty free · facts · oceans · plastic pollution

Why You Should Never Throw Out Those Silica Bags in New Shoes and What to Do With Them Instead

Whether we want to admit it or not, the truth is that our trash and plastic pollution has caused an environmental crisis. Think about it: almost every single time you shop for a product, it comes in tons of heavy plastic packaging. It may be easy to think that once the trash is out of sight, it disappears, but that couldn’t be further from the truth.

There are around 700 marine species currently facing extinction due to entanglement, pollution, and ingestion of plastic. With over 300 million tons of plastic produced and nearly 8.8 million tons getting dumped into the oceans annually, we must take action to curb our trash pollution problem.

Thankfully, there are small steps that we as consumers can take to minimize the amount of trash and plastic waste created every day, such as bringing a reusable shopping bag to the grocery store or bringing your own glass containers for bulk items. Every action, no matter how small, is meaningful and makes a difference to better our planet.

Have you ever thought about those tiny silica bags that come with shoes, purses, and other items to preserve freshness? Silica bags, made out of silicon dioxide, are seemingly harmless and are used to dry out whatever is around them. You’ve probably tossed them in the trash a dozen times without thinking twice, but once the minuscule bags end up in landfills, and then sadly, washed into the oceans, there is a good chance marine animals will unknowingly ingest them. In humans, silica gel can be irritating to the respiratory tract and may cause irritation of the digestive tract, plus dust from the beads may cause irritation to the skin and eyes, so letting this material loose in the environment where wildlife can come into contact with it is not advisable.

So, what if there were unique ways to reuse them?

If you’re stumped on how to reuse silica bags, check out the below suggestions. If you have more to add, leave a comment!

  1. If your phone or other electronic devices accidentally gets wet, put your phone in a jar full of the bags to help soak up the water.
  2. Use the bags to preserve old photos. Put a couple of bags in a box of old photos and it will stop the photos from sticking together and/or from getting ruined.
  3. Keep important documents, such as birth certificates, and other valuables moisture-free by adding the bags into the storage containers.
  4. Put the bags in your gym bag to help stop bacteria and/or mold from growing.
  5. Put a few of the bags underneath your windshield on the inside to help defog your windshield quicker.
  6. Place a bag with your reusable razor blade to help absorb the moisture, extending its life.

This article was original published on One Green Planet.